Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 193
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 193 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 10:00pm PST
at a firm that was only a sliver of goldman's size. >> the firm's stock is getting crushed yet again this morning, and mf's credit rating was cut to junk by moody's overnight. >> how can something like this be allowed to happen? how can n e individu completely shape the destiny of this firm and ultimately its demise? >> these two stories on this special ededion ontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprprprprprpp >> martin smith: it's one of america's most dangerous jobs. >> people have no idea what we go through on a day-to-day
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:00pm PST
midnight mass has just begun at the church of the nativity. it is the site where christians believe jesus was born, and as always got thousands of pilgrims from all of the world have flocked to manger square. this is being beamed right around the world on television. this is a particularly important christmas celebration for the west bank and for the palestinian territories. there is mahmoud abbas, the palestinian president, at this midnight mass, because, of course, it was just a few weeks ago that the united nations gave the palestinians non observer status at the united nations general assembly, and the church of the nativity in bethlehem have recently been also in the past 12 months declared a unesco world heritage site, so we are well into the midnight mass which is being celebrated at churches all over the world, and as you can see, mahmoud abbas is there for this. live to the square. pitifully -- particularly significant that mahmoud abbas is there. would you normally go, or is it just this year? >> he would normally go to the midnight mass. he makes a point of attending. we
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am PST
good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merchandise and how much of it are just factors beyond their control like the economy and the fiscal cliff? >> i think overall it was more probably 70 to 80% factors beyond the retailer's control. i think retailers had creative merchandise but i think the news didn't lead to a feel good factor. >> in any economy, good or bad, you always have some winners. who did really well this year? >> well, it looks like in terms of who did well so far, companies like american eagle outfitters limited, michael cors, macy's' tj and i would say costco was also a winner. >> on the flip side were there retailers that you had high hopes for going into the season but just didn't deliver in the end. >> certainly we will see some becoming more promotion al, some of the children's retailers, whether it was impacted by weather or there was competitive price and they did a good job at it, the children's retailers seemed to have a
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 7:00pm PST
something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply extend its operation twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $45 billion longer term treasuries while at the same time selling $45 billion short term. they've pretty much run out of short-term stuff to sell, so i think they'll be continuing to purchase the long term, but purchasing outright, expanding their balance sheet. >> reporter: and that would be on top of $40 billion a month already committed to buy mortgage-backed securities. some experts worry that $85 billion a month in spending will escalate inflation and,
PBS
Dec 8, 2012 1:30am PST
stands on an issue? and growing sentiment? >> it's a great question. i mean, if you look at the evolving public opinion on this, there were polls in 2004 that were taken by gallup and "washington post" and other people that showed about 60% of the public opposed same-sex marria marriage. gallup had a poll out that showed 53% support and about 40% oppose. there are measures on state ballots around the country last month, and all for of them, the same-sex marriage side won. so the justices can see the trend. in that gallup poll, more than 70% of young people support same-sex marriage. the question is, do they see themselves stopping something they think is moving too fast? or do they want to make sure they're not behind the curve of history? >> well, it's clear that the people that were against gay marriage, they were happy about this today. even though it does have the potential for creating this nationwide ruling that allows gay marriage. i think we're up to how many states? about nine states and washington, d.c. so there's definitely a lot of states out there that are going to be paying
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now tryin
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 1:00am PST
, which is back at work, republican leader mitch mcconnell warned he would not write a blank check to the white house, though he said he would keep an open mind on anything the president proposes. >> it appears to me the action, if there is any, is now in the senate side and we'll just have to see if we're able, on a bipartisan basis to move forward. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid said he too would try to reach agreement. but that was after spending most of the day hammering away at house republicans. reid blamed the current stand off on the inability of house republicans to pass their own plan which would have extended tax breaks for everyone making less than a million dollars a year. >> it's the mother of all debacles. that was brought up in an effort to send us something. he couldn't even pass it among the republicans it was so absurd. he meaning the speaker. so it's very clear now mr. president that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3. >> reporter: january 3 is the deadline for the new congress to start work. if a fiscal cliff fix isn't
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 12:00pm PST
an article, start a book, do something. which is why at the end of the war when he hadn't been able to do any of that, and there was no pay, so he wasn't earning any money at all, that he had to put his beloved house up for sale because he was bankrupt. the duke of wellington got number one london, the duke of moreberg got glenen palace and winston churchill got bankruptcy. a sign of the time. >> he had physical guts but he also had an acute awareness of who he was, the family he came fromment and i always remember some years ago going to blenham with a group of german parliamentarians. >> rose: the family home. >> where he was born, and the german member of parliament sitting next to me had never been to blenham before. and as we turned in and went up the drive, he turned to me and said if adolf hitler had known that winston churchill was born here, i don't think he ever would have gone to war. >> rose: winston churchill for the hour next. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this i
PBS
Dec 13, 2012 7:00pm PST
president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts that make up the cliff take effect, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst. her commentary on the markets today was dead on. >> so far, they trust that we would not be so stupid as to go over a cliff. >> reporter: but pelosi made clear what everyone knows-- time is running out to reach a deal by christmas >> we really have to come to some agreement in the next couple of days or the very beginning of next week for us to have engineered our way to a solution. >> reporter: the fiscal cliff is really a negotiation between two men, and one of them today was not sounding very happy. house speaker john boehner brought out the charts to make his case. >> here we are at the eleventh hour, and the president still isn't serious ab
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 4:00pm PST
. neither side is budging much. >> it is very hard for them to say yes to me. at some point, they have got to take me out of it and think about their voters. >> four weeks, the white house said that if i move on rates, they would make substantial concessions on spending cuts and entitlement reform. i did my part. they have done nothing. >> it would mean automatic spending cuts worth more than a trillion dollars. taxes for the average household would go up by about three and a half thousand dollars. most economists say the u.s. would be put back into recession and global growth could be halved. the u.s. defense budget alone would face a cut of $500 billion. companies like aircraft manufacturers are very nervous. this is already hurting business. >> this is a confidence detractor. and do i really have the confidence to make an investment when i know little about just our uncertainty, but where this is going? >> it is not just the big boys that worry about staying aloft. this has the same. >> everyone will have to pay more taxes. people will have to spend less money. the calamitous a fact is
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 4:00pm PST
once again the crucible of revolution. >> we are not aiming at toppling the president. we're not aiming at challenging -- challenging the sovereignty of the state. nothing that would lead to the disintegration of the state. why should we make the people swallow a constitution that could have been much better? and should have been much better. >> those arguments seem remote from the everyday grind of making a living. business is bad at these workshops and part of the problem is a lack of political direction. >> we have lost a lot in the economy since the revolution. almost all the sectors, with no exception, have lost jobs. >> little surprise that people say they would settle down -- for a little less political freedom if it meant a little more money in their pockets. >> a fragile picture there in cairo. let's go now to tunisia, where the uprising began two years ago after a young street vendor to set himself alight in protest. has the promise of the so-called revolution lived up to expectations? our chief international correspondent reported two years ago. she is back there for u
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 12:00am PST
have jessica chastain back at this table. >> thank you so much. >> rose: let's talk about captain bigelow. >> yes. >> rose: what was the call from her and what did they say. >> that was the exciting thing, i was shooting momma in toronto and i got a text from mehegan from an purr naah pictures and says if i ever ask you anything it is to call me for five minutes, it was very dramatic and deserved a call back. >> so i called her and she said there is a big movie she is making, the part is amazing, it reminded her of jodie foster in silence of the lambs, it had been told i was unavailable because of my schedule but wouldn't take no for an answer. >> rose: bigelow or mehegan. >> mehegan. >> look i am a huge fan of bigelow, she is a big hero of mine, of course i am interested let me know if we can make the schedules work, and then within the week i got cold called from kathryn bigelow, super exciting i was coming home from work and turned my cellphone on and had a message from kathryn, asking me to call her back, i never met her before, kind of freaked out in the car and had to compos
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 1:00am PST
cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the school district couldn't afford it. >> susie: meanwhile, a ranking democrat on the house budget committee tells "nightly business report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face discussions. it's always better to be talking than no
PBS
Dec 16, 2012 3:30pm PST
american petroleum institute. >>> issue one. newtown nightmare. at least 27 people, including 18 children were killed on friday at an elementary school in newtown, connecticut. at least one shooter opened fire. sandy hook elementary school teaches ch >>> question. the federal assault weapons ban was a federal law in 1994. that law prohibited the manufacturing of semiautomatic firearms, so-called assault weapons, for civilian use. the ban was passed by congress on september 13th, 1994, and signed into law by president bill clinton. the 10-year law expired on september 13th, 2004. there have been multiple attempts to renew the weapons law ban but no bill has been legislated. will president obama revive the federal federal assault weapons ban? pat buchanan. >> john, the president had both houses of congress with him in 2009 for two years, and he didn't do it then. i doubt if he will try it now, but he may do it. but take a look at what happened up here. this individual came in and murdered his mother, who was a teacher, i believe of the kindergarten kids and may have murdered his fa
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm PST
do a better job of getting it out. we need to look at how we need to adjust. >> rose: julianna goldman and stuart stevens when we begin. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion w
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 7:00pm PST
.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 1:00am PST
are better off with a bad deal than no deal at all? >> you know susie when peopletal they are talking about a bad deal in political terms. frankly it's republicans that are most worried about the bad deal they have most leverage. the president has the most leverage. they are worried about a bad deal. any deal that gets us past the fiscal cliff is going to be seen as a good deal. >> susie: it seems like we are further apart than last week when president obama gave the last minute pep talk to get the talks going. do we have to reach some point of pain in washington, d.c. that people get mos motivated to geta deal. how does it work in washington? >> i wish i knew.it seems that n ratcratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like the pain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentiall
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 6:00pm PST
nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have been alive with the joy of children is now, instead, a season of mourning their loss in newtown, connecticut. the first of the funerals took place today for the victims of the massacre at an elementary school. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> suarez: flowers streamed into funeral homes ar
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 6:00pm PST
and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you.
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 6:00pm PST
head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs statio
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 6:00pm PST
. >> ifill: the school shootings that shook the nation sparked a new call to action at the white house today. the president vowed to have proposals ready for the new congress that convenes next month. somber scenes of mourning played out once again today in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james brady-- the press secretary critically wounded in the shooting of president reagan in 1981-- to talk about gun violence. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> ifill: instead, in the wake of the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, mr. obama said, "this time, the words need to lead to action" on gun violence. >> the vast majority of responsible law abiding gun owners would be some of the first to say that we should be able to keep an irresponsible law breaking few from buying a weapon of war. i'm willing to bet that they don't think that using a gun and using common sense are incompatible ideas. there is a big chunk of space between what the 2nd amendment means a
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
>> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and impr
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 3:00pm PST
did my part. they've done nothing. >> brown: the public sniping continued: at the white house, press secretary jay carney fired back that the president had shown more of a willingness to compromise than republicans have. >> he never said, either in private or in public, that this was his final offer. he understands that to reach a deal it would require some further negotiation. there is not much further he could go because after all, unlike his counterparts in this negotiation he has already gone half way on both sides of the equation. >> brown: the president would raise tax rates on households making at least $400,000 a year. by contrast, boehner's plan b pegs that threshold at $1 million a year. it also drops the $1,000 child tax credit for families who don't earn enough to pay federal income taxes. and, it would let an expansion of the college tuition tax credit expire. republicans argued both those provisions were to have been temporary anyway, under the president's original stimulus package. initially, boehner's plan did nothing to stop across-the-board spending cuts that take e
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 3:00pm PST
examines a new report blaming the state department for systemic failures in security at the diplomatic mission in benghazi, libya, where four americans died. >> woodruff: from damascus, i.t.n.'s alex thomson reports on the impact the rebel siege of the syrian capital is having on supporters of the assad regime. >> in this educational district and the one next door alone, in the past two weeks 35 small children and two teachers have been killed. >> ifill: we sit down with retiring connecticut senator joe lieberman, the democrat turned independent reflects on the tragedy in his home state and his 24 years in u.s. senate. >> there is reason for people to be angry skeptical and cynical about the willingness or capacity of congress to act or stop mass violence in our country. >> woodruff: and kwame holman remembers conservative jurist former solicitor general and failed supreme court nominee robert h. bork. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of t
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 12:00am PST
then you know, to be able to, to be able to peel back the curtain and have a glimpse at a process and a character and what kind of, what is the psychology behind somebody that dead indicates ten years of their life exclusively to finding one person. >> what was going on there. why did it take so long. what were they doing. you have america the most powerful nation in the planet and you have this guy. i take people behind the scenes to see whattate would be like to be an officer and what it would be like to be tracking osama, and me you did it. >> rose: kathryn bigelow and mark boal coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countri
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 4:00am PST
we're tired. we got to be able to think when we're tired. >> narrator: at 3:30 pm on friday, the 13th of august, the heat index in little rock was 112 degrees. will james, a 16-year-old, 250-pound lineman for pulaski academy, began to falter. >> the team was doing up-downs, and will starts to stagger. and we ran from here over to here, and we caught him about right in here. ( siren wailing ) >> narrator: it was heat stroke. will was rushed to the icu at arkansas children's hospital. >> when he arrived to us, he was comatose and on the ventilator. initially, his kidneys were doing okay, but over the first 48 hours, they deteriorated, and he went into renal failure. his blood pressure was really low; it was in the 40s. his temperature was very high. he was obviously very critically ill. >> the waiting room was full of people there for will-- teammates, parents, coaches. there were media people roaming around, because not only had will collapsed from heat stroke; two days earlier, another child had, as well. >> narrator: the other boy was also a high school football player from a sm
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 7:00pm PST
three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. with time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it's going to require what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 1:00am PST
speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mea
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 6:00pm PST
gave no indication of movement. >> last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes, but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here, and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> reporter: adding to the urgency, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned he'll have to begin taking "extraordinary measures" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as
PBS
Dec 13, 2012 6:00pm PST
>> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 3:00pm PST
good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a gunman at a school, mass casualties, and emergency crews-- the scene was eerily familiar and, once again, horrifying. this time, tragedy struck at a grade school in a small connecticut town. 20 of the 27 dead are children. we begin our coverage with president obama's emotional address to the nation this afternoon. >> we've endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. and each time i learn the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of
PBS
Dec 15, 2012 1:00am PST
friday lull that we've seen in the last three weeks that consumers are spending at a very restrained rate simply because they don't have the money and there's a little bit of a fear factor out there. >> reporter: but, there are those who say it's wrong to credit the fiscal cliff for the lackluster holiday shopping season. more likely they think shoppers are playing a game of chicken with retailers, waiting for more stores to drop prices. if that's true, shoppers may be disappointed. >> will retailers react to the softness we've seen, the typical lull? i don't have a sense that that's happening. but, the industry is very fragmented. >> reporter: tomorrow is considered a crucial holiday shopping day. here in manhattan the forecast calls for sunny skies and cool temperatures. perfect for a little spending. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> well, if you driving to the mall, you are paying a lot less for gas, pump prices are plunging dropping seven and a half percent in november. the national average for gasoline is now $3.30 a gallon. >> and that is the main reason consume
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 4:00pm PST
opened fire in a school full of little children. and the small community of newtown, conn., at least 26 teachers and children are killed. the shooter is also dead. this is the 12 the mass shooting this year and america and mr. obama said that the country must take action. >> a friday morning with chris this looming. -- christmas shooting. moments later, heavily armed officers went in and it terrified children aged between 5-10 were being carried out. >> i saw some of the bullets going past the hall that i was right next to and then the teacher pulled me into her classroom. we heard shots and everyone went on the ground. >> we all went over to a corner and the teacher was to keep us until the police officers. >> they had machine guns. >> i heard seven loud booms and then the teachers told us to go in the corner. we all huddled. i kept hearing these booming noises. >> as alarmed parents rushed back to the school, are the reports told of the gun at confronting a children and three -- confronting a teacher. it became clear that this was murdered on a horrific scale. >> there were fatalities
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm PST
justifying my place with that world. >> cooking is a simple equation, no matter if it's fine dining at our level, casual dining or fast food. it's about product, about execution. so, yes, you need to have that quality product and you need to have people who can execute it. so it's really trying to bring those two together, that strong team that has a common vision, a common goal and building relationships with the suppliers. and that's so, so important. make sure you have relationships and you're supporting the suppliers so they can continue to do what they do. >> you know, we do exaggerate in america all the time. so now we are locavore, you know local food and now we get totally crazy with organic to the point where i have been to restaurants where they practically come and introduce you to the carrot. that carrot was born on the 7th of may, we named it hilda. we can get exaggerated. too. >> rose: great chefs for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 4:00pm PST
i think we are looking at is a very deeply split egypt and one that is about to launch into a parliamentary election campaign. now the opposition faces an uphill struggle. it has not been terribly unified. it has to manage to unify itself more over the problems that broke out with this referendum. the question is whether they can sustain that unity for the muslim brotherhood and for president morsi. they also have a challenge because although they won this referendum, the support, the turn out was low. the support they got at just under 64% was less than a referendum held last year where they got about 77%. and president morsi, the government may soon have to take some unpopular measures to try and prop up the economy here, which could hurt them at the ballot box. >> let's pick up on the reports of the economy. there have been reports of people taking savings out of banks. is there fear there could be capital flight out of egypt and possibly even the liberal people who are not happy with this constitution, uping stakes, leaving the country and ep grating. >> there are all sort
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
. i want to bounce back and forth, if i can. >> the character jack, at the beginning of the film, is a radio host in toronto. the show is called "the truth." he is trying to bring attention to situations in society that are untruthful. , but his past is one that is very dark. if he was involved in the cia he says in the movie that he has done things that are unforgivable and unforgettable. he is trying to get amends -- somehow make amends for that in his life. it is an impossible thing to do. according to the things he did -- he will never be able to make amends. but at least he has to try. thrown into this emotional baggage this character has comes this issue that has to do with forrest whitacker and eva longoria's character. forrest is a head of a peasant movement in south america. years before, i was responsible for putting him in jail for 10 years. he has been labeled an ego terrorist by a country -- company controlling the water rights. tavis: an ecoterrorist. >> there is a big break up. they end up killing a lot of people, quarantining areas, getting rid of the population. he g
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 3:00pm PST
supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 193 (some duplicates have been removed)